Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Introduction

The Mainstream Soloist: So - what does he do actually? He plays soli over harmony stereotypes. That does include soloing over bass and drums or over drums only. Because - with the exception of a track consisting of drums only - there is always a harmonic context of overriding importance ruling. Our soloist can construct his soli melodically, rhythmically or with a focus on effect. In mainstream music he usually plays - aside from very rare exceptions - "inside": he plays harmonically. The Western chord system - central here: the dominant7-chord - is based on the natural note scale if you look at the final analysis. The natural note scale is based on overtones. And the overtones follow mathematical laws and physical constants. Therefore a harmony that sounds "good" is hearable math. But it's an error to think, that people who play "weird" are (what one might assume of cause) automatically mathematically ungifted: If we follow the overtone scale building on a base sinus tone farther up to the high areas, we will find in actual fact notes that are sounding disharmonic in relation to the base note. Good "outside" players are moving in these overtone top areas unconsciously - but on the audible level. (Depending on the sound producing device, the overtone top areas are not consciously audible ususally). Apart from that, sounds without disharmonic overtones ususally have a tendeny to sound dull and boring. Like the standard preset flute sound of a keyboard in your local department store. It's the goal of this tutorial, to give the wannabe mainstream soloist useful aids of a universal kind. He's supposed to learn playing "inside" without making a fool of himself. That doesn't automatically include that he will be a good "outside" player too. The latter first of all needs a kind of "ears" that he either already has - or not likely will get in the future. That's why I can of cause give hints to exotic scales and the like in the course of the tutorial. But: If the outside playing is not meant to sound academical or constructed - then - for reasons demonstrated above - the best performances in the field origin "from the belly". Apropos "from the belly": This has nothing diffuse or unscientific in it. Because: It does only mean, that the player uses learned experiences and applies them on a subconscious level. The subconscious is able to achieve far more outstanding substancial performances of a high complexity than the limited conscious mind, that is prisoner of dual logic always. If you doubt that, ask a  mathematician about the obstacles blocking solutions for the way-finding problem (the shortest connection from A to B in company with extremely many variables). One never should underestimate the subconscious: it is computimg on quantumn level. And that's why my teaching method is as it is: It is not the goal of this tutorial to breed realbook players! (The "realbook" is a collection of jazz standards written down in a special notation. A kind of "bible" for jazz musicians). Realbook players who know three scales for every chord - being unable to free themselves from their academic cages at the same time. There are enough schools and tutorials for that kind of players on the market. Their graduates are most often of an academic impressiveness: state of the art craftyness, dull intuitiveness. Some people call them "plumbers". The final goal here is to get the intuitive soloist! This kind of player ideally can play everthing that's currently in his mind and realize it immediately. To achieve this he must first of all: practice... practice... practice... and then practice again :) Appended Tracks: How to use them: under the line it is better to exercise to always the same pattern - but in all keys  - than to practice a hundred of things half-hearted. That may be boring - but it's very effective to build a pool of riffs that work. Surely everyone has been in the situation before to be unable to play a riff in a rare key that he handles sleepwalkingly in others - a frustrating experience that can be avoided by this method. And keys are more parallel then most people think. Lazyness at this point will be punished by emabarrassment later. The "beauty" of the tracks: beauty was not intended - some may even appear tasteless. The audible versions are limited to the absolute basics - the midi versions also have variations (some of them bitchy, but perfectly fitted to learn some rhythmical refinement. If you didn't know where the "1" is beforehand, you might tumble into problems there at times). And of course everyone with a midi-editor can carve the midi versions to his individual needs (cutting or transposing parts of them - using other sounds - whatever comes in handy). They were made using "Band in a box" - a Canadian practicing programm that is not the "hit" when it comes to matters of musical style - but very recommendable for practicing in general. Would you leave stage just because the sound is a disaster and go without cashing the salary? No? So - take the quality as it is please - built for practicing, not for enjoying:) Recommendation for the advanced player: after mastering the basic patterns provided and explained in this document: go and create more practicing patterns of your own. Apart from collecting and copying stereotypes of your favourite genre that you heard somewhere and reconstruct for your needs, you might also take the basic patterns here and combine them by repeating and then continuously transposing the repeated. In reality these progressions often appear as chains in compositions (usually only parts of those chains) . The most common transposing applied is using halftone- and wholetone-steps, perfect fourths and fifths .

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Introduction

The Mainstream Soloist: So - what does he do actually? He plays soli over harmony stereotypes. That does include soloing over bass and drums or over drums only. Because - with the exception of a track consisting of drums only - there is always a harmonic context of overriding importance ruling. Our soloist can construct his soli melodically, rhythmically or with a focus on effect. In mainstream music he usually plays - aside from very rare exceptions - "inside": he plays harmonically. The Western chord system - central here: the dominant7- chord - is based on the natural note scale if you look at the final analysis. The natural note scale is based on overtones. And the overtones follow mathematical laws and physical constants. Therefore a harmony that sounds "good" is hearable math. But it's an error to think, that people who play "weird" are (what one might assume of cause) automatically mathematically ungifted: If we follow the overtone scale building on a base sinus tone farther up to the high areas, we will find in actual fact notes that are sounding disharmonic in relation to the base note. Good "outside" players are moving in these overtone top areas unconsciously - but on the audible level. (Depending on the sound producing device, the overtone top areas are not consciously audible ususally). Apart from that, sounds without disharmonic overtones ususally have a tendeny to sound dull and boring. Like the standard preset flute sound of a keyboard in your local department store. It's the goal of this tutorial, to give the wannabe mainstream soloist useful aids of a universal kind. He's supposed to learn playing "inside" without making a fool of himself. That doesn't automatically include that he will be a good "outside" player too. The latter first of all needs a kind of "ears" that he either already has - or not likely will get in the future. That's why I can of cause give hints to exotic scales and the like in the course of the tutorial. But: If the outside playing is not meant to sound academical or constructed - then - for reasons demonstrated above - the best performances in the field origin "from the belly". Apropos "from the belly": This has nothing diffuse or unscientific in it. Because: It does only mean, that the player uses learned experiences and applies them on a subconscious level. The subconscious is able to achieve far more outstanding substancial performances of a high complexity than the limited conscious mind, that is prisoner of dual logic always. If you doubt that, ask a  mathematician about the obstacles blocking solutions for the way-finding problem (the shortest connection from A to B in company with extremely many variables). One never should underestimate the subconscious: it is computimg on quantumn level. And that's why my teaching method is as it is: It is not the goal of this tutorial to breed realbook players! (The "realbook" is a collection of jazz standards written down in a special notation. A kind of "bible" for jazz musicians). Realbook players who know three scales for every chord - being unable to free themselves from their academic cages at the same time. There are enough schools and tutorials for that kind of players on the market. Their graduates are most often of an academic impressiveness: state of the art craftyness, dull intuitiveness. Some people call them "plumbers". The final goal here is to get the intuitive soloist! This kind of player ideally can play everthing that's currently in his mind and realize it immediately. To achieve this he must first of all: practice... practice... practice... and then practice again :) Appended Tracks: How to use them: under the line it is better to exercise to always the same pattern - but in all keys  - than to practice a hundred of things half-hearted. That may be boring - but it's very effective to build a pool of riffs that work. Surely everyone has been in the situation before to be unable to play a riff in a rare key that he handles sleepwalkingly in others - a frustrating experience that can be avoided by this method. And keys are more parallel then most people think. Lazyness at this point will be punished by emabarrassment later. The "beauty" of the tracks: beauty was not intended - some may even appear tasteless. The audible versions are limited to the absolute basics - the midi versions also have variations (some of them bitchy, but perfectly fitted to learn some rhythmical refinement. If you didn't know where the "1" is beforehand, you might tumble into problems there at times). And of course everyone with a midi-editor can carve the midi versions to his individual needs (cutting or transposing parts of them - using other sounds - whatever comes in handy). They were made using "Band in a box" - a Canadian practicing programm that is not the "hit" when it comes to matters of musical style - but very recommendable for practicing in general. Would you leave stage just because the sound is a disaster and go without cashing the salary? No? So - take the quality as it is please - built for practicing, not for enjoying:) Recommendation for the advanced player: after mastering the basic patterns provided and explained in this document: go and create more practicing patterns of your own. Apart from collecting and copying stereotypes of your favourite genre that you heard somewhere and reconstruct for your needs, you might also take the basic patterns here and combine them by repeating and then continuously transposing the repeated. In reality these progressions often appear as chains in compositions (usually only parts of those chains) . The most common transposing applied is using halftone- and wholetone-steps, perfect fourths and fifths .

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe