Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

More chords

There are more chords of cause :) Diminished, Sus4, etc (this is not a chord encyclopedia - it's enough if you understand the naming system). There are also diverse writing conventions: "Maj7" for example could also be written as "maj7". I use the capital "M" to tell it better from the small "m" that stands for Minor. The following way to explain the system of adding chord numerals is the most easy to understand in my eyes, if you see chord names that don't belong to the above mentioned stereoptype chords of the cadence: when you replace tones of the chord by tones that don't belong to the root scale, then the ouput  is called altered chords. Altered chords: referring to C ("Major", "Ionian", 1.step") the "normal", non altered tones are: C | D | E | F | G | A | B So the following tones remain now that don't belong to the root scale: C# respectively Db | D# respectively Eb | F# respectively Gb | G# respectively Ab | A# respectively Bb. The Eb was dealt with here in the case of Minor already. In the Blues however we can pack Major and Minor into one Dominant 7th chord at the same time. If this is done, the major third is at the bottom of the structure, the minor third appears as #9. In it's basic form the resulting chord looks as following: C7#9 C | E | G | A# | D# A typical Jimi Hendrix chord. And a typical chord in Blues and Funk too. Okay, now we've left over three altered tones yet: C# respectively Db | F# respectively Gb | G# respectively Ab Whether you start with a Major, Minor- or a Dominant7th chord: If you add a C# on top of a C in the root - then you will get something sounding "weird". These chords are always called b9 (the C# is interpreted as Db). Example CMaj7b9: C | E | G | B | Db Now we have two altered tones left: F# respectively Gb und G# respectively Ab The F# respectively Gb: is usually called b5 or #11. Our last altered note is the G# respectively Ab: it appears usually as #5 in the chord name. I won't also discuss "Augmented", "sus" etc here. This would only end in the jungle of classical and newer harmony systems. These all use different theoretical approaches and naming conventions. As an example: there are harmonics which use layerd fourths instead of thirds. Some problems can be rode around that way - but it generates other. The system using layered thirds and four-voiced chords is established and used everywhere - therfore one should know it. The attendee here should be able to see a chord symbol and then know at once, which tones to use to build them. That's enough. But for the curious explorers among you I give a mini hint here: take a more exotic scale (not a symmetrical one like the whole tone scale - I'm thinking of something like Harmonic Minor or the "whole tone half tone" scale for example). Then use the thirds of the scale, layer them on one another to build their resulting four-voiced chords and take a closer look at the outcoming cadences. A universe is unfolding in front of your eyes:) Remark, addressing readers looking for the absolutely precise or wondering why I'm not willing to deal with some details in this soloist school: above we have seen: In any "normal" key we get three m7 chords, 2 Maj7 chords etc. These three chords are of course part of other keys too  - but on other steps. In principle it would e.g. be possible therefore, to play three different keys/scales over any m7 chord, because any of these is part of three keys. But if we do this, e.g. over a II-V progression, then we would have to change the key inside the course of the progression -  and that would break the progression. Exactly this - and more - are the people doing systematically that I call "plumbers" above. Of course a soloist can do this, to "colour" some bars in his solo. It is especially okay, when the progression doesn't change for a longer time in the course of a given arrangement. But: usually a song has a melody over the whole structure (even if we can't hear it - it's woven in the harmonies)  - and we would work against that by changing the key against the composer's intention. Everybody who was ever on a jazz session surely has noticed some participating musicians who sit there, bend down over their realbooks (the "realbook" is a kind of "bible" with written down lead sheets of jazz standards). They are starring into these (instead of using their ears) - and play a different scale over any appearing chord using their theoretical knowledge of harmonics and scales. Usually every riff is phrased in the same way by them: groups of two eighths, the first eights long on the beat, the second eights short on the swing-offbeat. If you say "bee bop" you get that phrasing. And that's why this style is called Bebop. It may be an impressing ability, to be able to eject a matching "something" over any given chord in an unknown lead sheet. Well - I personally am as impressed by that, as by a guy in a tavern who is able to juggle 100 beer mats on his erected finger. The soloist I prefer and whom I coach here doesn't think in bar-stepping chord changes - he thinks song-overall. He doesn't fill in the blank areas in a painting book for children with ever mutating Taj-Mahal ornaments - he expresses the essence of the Taj Mahal. He doesn't think like Albrecht Dürer - he thinks like a Chinese painter or like Vincent van Gogh (where Vincent van Gogh is our Rock- or Punk Musician here). The soloist I prefer is not the paid craftsman working for the architect - he is the architect. The soloist trained here is a mainstream soloist. AFTER(!!!) he really MASTERED(!!!) all the techniques taught in this tutorial - he may also paint ornaments. But he shouldn't start by painting the antenna of the insect in the dewdrop on the leafs in the woods -  he should start painting the woods as a whole. That is why I am not detailing too much of these ornamental techniques in the course of this tutorial. If you master what is recommended here, you don't need it and you are able to play organic sounding soli that seize the hearts of the listeners. If you insist in learning that too, you may go and buy the corresponding books (there are tons of that on the market). But I recommend to derive and deduce it from the knowledge you gain here - that way it will be cheaper, will bring more fun and experience and the result will be more genuine. A good soloist has his genuine style. He is no substitute for another persona.

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

More chords

There are more chords of cause :) Diminished, Sus4, etc (this is not a chord encyclopedia - it's enough if you understand the naming system). There are also diverse writing conventions: "Maj7" for example could also be written as "maj7". I use the capital "M" to tell it better from the small "m" that stands for Minor. The following way to explain the system of adding chord numerals is the most easy to understand in my eyes, if you see chord names that don't belong to the above mentioned stereoptype chords of the cadence: when you replace tones of the chord by tones that don't belong to the root scale, then the ouput  is called altered chords. Altered chords: referring to C ("Major", "Ionian", 1.step") the "normal", non altered tones are: C | D | E | F | G | A | B So the following tones remain now that don't belong to the root scale: C# respectively Db | D# respectively Eb | F# respectively Gb | G# respectively Ab | A# respectively Bb. The Eb was dealt with here in the case of Minor already. In the Blues however we can pack Major and Minor into one Dominant 7th chord at the same time. If this is done, the major third is at the bottom of the structure, the minor third appears as #9. In it's basic form the resulting chord looks as following: C7#9 C | E | G | A# | D# A typical Jimi Hendrix chord. And a typical chord in Blues and Funk too. Okay, now we've left over three altered tones yet: C# respectively Db | F# respectively Gb | G# respectively Ab Whether you start with a Major, Minor- or a Dominant7th chord: If you add a C# on top of a C in the root - then you will get something sounding "weird". These chords are always called b9 (the C# is interpreted as Db). Example CMaj7b9: C | E | G | B | Db Now we have two altered tones left: F# respectively Gb und G# respectively Ab The F# respectively Gb: is usually called b5 or #11. Our last altered note is the G# respectively Ab: it appears usually as #5 in the chord name. I won't also discuss "Augmented", "sus" etc here. This would only end in the jungle of classical and newer harmony systems. These all use different theoretical approaches and naming conventions. As an example: there are harmonics which use layerd fourths instead of thirds. Some problems can be rode around that way - but it generates other. The system using layered thirds and four-voiced chords is established and used everywhere - therfore one should know it. The attendee here should be able to see a chord symbol and then know at once, which tones to use to build them. That's enough. But for the curious explorers among you I give a mini hint here: take a more exotic scale (not a symmetrical one like the whole tone scale - I'm thinking of something like Harmonic Minor or the "whole tone half tone" scale for example). Then use the thirds of the scale, layer them on one another to build their resulting four- voiced chords and take a closer look at the outcoming cadences. A universe is unfolding in front of your eyes:) Remark, addressing readers looking for the absolutely precise or wondering why I'm not willing to deal with some details in this soloist school: above we have seen: In any "normal" key we get three m7 chords, 2 Maj7 chords etc. These three chords are of course part of other keys too  - but on other steps. In principle it would e.g. be possible therefore, to play three different keys/scales over any m7 chord, because any of these is part of three keys. But if we do this, e.g. over a II- V progression, then we would have to change the key inside the course of the progression -  and that would break the progression. Exactly this - and more - are the people doing systematically that I call "plumbers" above. Of course a soloist can do this, to "colour" some bars in his solo. It is especially okay, when the progression doesn't change for a longer time in the course of a given arrangement. But: usually a song has a melody over the whole structure (even if we can't hear it - it's woven in the harmonies)  - and we would work against that by changing the key against the composer's intention. Everybody who was ever on a jazz session surely has noticed some participating musicians who sit there, bend down over their realbooks (the "realbook" is a kind of "bible" with written down lead sheets of jazz standards). They are starring into these (instead of using their ears) - and play a different scale over any appearing chord using their theoretical knowledge of harmonics and scales. Usually every riff is phrased in the same way by them: groups of two eighths, the first eights long on the beat, the second eights short on the swing- offbeat. If you say "bee bop" you get that phrasing. And that's why this style is called Bebop. It may be an impressing ability, to be able to eject a matching "something" over any given chord in an unknown lead sheet. Well - I personally am as impressed by that, as by a guy in a tavern who is able to juggle 100 beer mats on his erected finger. The soloist I prefer and whom I coach here doesn't think in bar-stepping chord changes - he thinks song-overall. He doesn't fill in the blank areas in a painting book for children with ever mutating Taj-Mahal ornaments - he expresses the essence of the Taj Mahal. He doesn't think like Albrecht Dürer - he thinks like a Chinese painter or like Vincent van Gogh (where Vincent van Gogh is our Rock- or Punk Musician here). The soloist I prefer is not the paid craftsman working for the architect - he is the architect. The soloist trained here is a mainstream soloist. AFTER(!!!) he really MASTERED(!!!) all the techniques taught in this tutorial - he may also paint ornaments. But he shouldn't start by painting the antenna of the insect in the dewdrop on the leafs in the woods -  he should start painting the woods as a whole. That is why I am not detailing too much of these ornamental techniques in the course of this tutorial. If you master what is recommended here, you don't need it and you are able to play organic sounding soli that seize the hearts of the listeners. If you insist in learning that too, you may go and buy the corresponding books (there are tons of that on the market). But I recommend to derive and deduce it from the knowledge you gain here - that way it will be cheaper, will bring more fun and experience and the result will be more genuine. A good soloist has his genuine style. He is no substitute for another persona.

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe