Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Other Scales

the most common first: the chromatic scale C | C# | D | D# | E | F | F# | G | G# | A | A# | B | C the other way round: C | B | Bb | A | Ab | G | Gb | F| E | Eb | D | Db | C generally the chromatic scale is: - extremely versatile - not easy to handle It's not easy to handle, since chromatic riffs only sound "good" (seemingly "inside"), if they start - and especially end - on a tone of the underlying chord or it's corresponding scale. This will hardly succeed, if the player doesn't master the standard scales over the steroptype harmonies (including the blues) beforehand. Nevertheless: the chromatic scale should be practiced until it is mastered fluently. On all instruments. For singers and blowers - since they rely on intonation via their ears - it is a means of aural training. and: The chromatic scale can be used for cheating. If the player made a mistake, he can turn the error into a win by completing the errantly played tone into a chromatic riff immediately. On the long run it's better to make no mistake at all in the first place of course;) The following scales are quite common in jazz additionally: The whole tone scale It's available in just two variations of structure. Therefore it is easy learnable basically. (Not easy for singers and blowers though - it's creating a similar intonation obstacle as the chromatic scale - and therefore for just that reason it is even more important to optimize intonation by winning this specific challenge too). On the other hand it is only sparsely applicable to most material because it doesn't build up much tonal tension. Here it is: C | D | E | F# | G# | A# | C and C# | D# | F | G | A | B |C# The diminished scale It's also called octatonic scale or half tone whole tone respectively whole tone half tone. The naming confusion is afforded to it's structure: It consists of 8 instead of 7 tones and it alternates whole tone and half tone steps. When we analyze it more closely, we see that there are only three different structures possible (that each can be started on different tones and thereby generate a new scale variation). Therefore it's also realtively easy to learn. Half tone whole tone: C | C# | D# | E | F# | G | A | Bb | C whole tone half tone: C | D | D# | F | F# | G# | A | Bb | C The scale is a good match for b9 chords. The altered scale C | C# |D# |E |F# |G# |A# |C is a match for altered Dom7 chords, e.g.: #9 Other scales worth to be mentioned here: Harmonic Minor and it's variants Harmonic Minor is one - of many more scales - that are common in Arabian music. I won't start a chapter about Arabian music here now - that's a whole universe of it's own. Many Arabian scales cannot be played on Western instruments easily (or at all) because they are also including quarter tone steps - not only half tone steps like European scales. In European classic, J.S.Bach was the absolute grandmaster of Harmonic Minor. Harmonic Minor in C: C | D | D# | F | G | G# | B |C Harmonic Minor variations are also applicable in blues quite well. Some other interessant exotics: On Bali they have a - completely different - scale system of their own. It needs specially made gongs. One could say, that every clan has it's own slightly different scale - originating from the different gongs, made with the help of secret formulas that are passed from generation to generation inside the local families. Indian scales I don't show them in detail here. The main obstacle for Europeans in Indian music are not the scales anyway - it is the rhythm. Handling a specific syllable- spelling technique the Indians get controll over polyrhythmic and polymetric rhythms where Europeans (that try to count the bars) have hard times when they try to follow the rhythmical flow. Polyrhythmic and polymetric rhythms are common in African and Arabian music too. There's also an African scale named GoGo (that - looked at closely - roots on dominant 7). "Band in a Box" and similar composing programms are rooting on dominant 7 too by the way - and we see again: everything is connected:)

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Other Scales

the most common first: the chromatic scale C | C# | D | D# | E | F | F# | G | G# | A | A# | B | C the other way round: C | B | Bb | A | Ab | G | Gb | F| E | Eb | D | Db | C generally the chromatic scale is: - extremely versatile - not easy to handle It's not easy to handle, since chromatic riffs only sound "good" (seemingly "inside"), if they start - and especially end - on a tone of the underlying chord or it's corresponding scale. This will hardly succeed, if the player doesn't master the standard scales over the steroptype harmonies (including the blues) beforehand. Nevertheless: the chromatic scale should be practiced until it is mastered fluently. On all instruments. For singers and blowers - since they rely on intonation via their ears - it is a means of aural training. and: The chromatic scale can be used for cheating. If the player made a mistake, he can turn the error into a win by completing the errantly played tone into a chromatic riff immediately. On the long run it's better to make no mistake at all in the first place of course;) The following scales are quite common in jazz additionally: The whole tone scale It's available in just two variations of structure. Therefore it is easy learnable basically. (Not easy for singers and blowers though - it's creating a similar intonation obstacle as the chromatic scale - and therefore for just that reason it is even more important to optimize intonation by winning this specific challenge too). On the other hand it is only sparsely applicable to most material because it doesn't build up much tonal tension. Here it is: C | D | E | F# | G# | A# | C and C# | D# | F | G | A | B |C# The diminished scale It's also called octatonic scale or half tone whole tone respectively whole tone half tone. The naming confusion is afforded to it's structure: It consists of 8 instead of 7 tones and it alternates whole tone and half tone steps. When we analyze it more closely, we see that there are only three different structures possible (that each can be started on different tones and thereby generate a new scale variation). Therefore it's also realtively easy to learn. Half tone whole tone: C | C# | D# | E | F# | G | A | Bb | C whole tone half tone: C | D | D# | F | F# | G# | A | Bb | C The scale is a good match for b9 chords. The altered scale C | C# |D# |E |F# |G# |A# |C is a match for altered Dom7 chords, e.g.: #9 Other scales worth to be mentioned here: Harmonic Minor and it's variants Harmonic Minor is one - of many more scales - that are common in Arabian music. I won't start a chapter about Arabian music here now - that's a whole universe of it's own. Many Arabian scales cannot be played on Western instruments easily (or at all) because they are also including quarter tone steps - not only half tone steps like European scales. In European classic, J.S.Bach was the absolute grandmaster of Harmonic Minor. Harmonic Minor in C: C | D | D# | F | G | G# | B |C Harmonic Minor variations are also applicable in blues quite well. Some other interessant exotics: On Bali they have a - completely different - scale system of their own. It needs specially made gongs. One could say, that every clan has it's own slightly different scale - originating from the different gongs, made with the help of secret formulas that are passed from generation to generation inside the local families. Indian scales I don't show them in detail here. The main obstacle for Europeans in Indian music are not the scales anyway - it is the rhythm. Handling a specific syllable-spelling technique the Indians get controll over polyrhythmic and polymetric rhythms where Europeans (that try to count the bars) have hard times when they try to follow the rhythmical flow. Polyrhythmic and polymetric rhythms are common in African and Arabian music too. There's also an African scale named GoGo (that - looked at closely - roots on dominant 7). "Band in a Box" and similar composing programms are rooting on dominant 7 too by the way - and we see again: everything is connected:)

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe