Art            Lip               Welcome                  to my universe
I‘m a: singer/songwriter, multi-instrumentalist/trumpetplayer, producer/performer, photographer/visual artist, science fiction writer
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Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Weirder Options

Here I am dealing with outside playing. I won't explain any maybe-new terms now still - this is a topic for the advanced player. The most common way of playing outside is, to parallel-shift constant-structure intervals (thereby including intervals that are not common to the root tone scale). Example: C | C# | D then C# | D | D# then D | D# | E etc (That was chromatic). Like every other parallel-shifting option mentioned here, this works ascending (like in the example) as well as descending. We could of cause use binary groups of tones instead of the proposed ternary groups too. ("Binary" and "ternary" was dealed with in my chapters about rhythm). The parallel-shifting method works with all intervals. The least "mean" sounding then are the intervals: half tone, whole tone, perfect fourths and perfect fifths. The tritone is also very popular. The learning effort for guitarists is low here - and that's exactly the reason for the widespreadness of this method in the circles of stringed instrument players. Every other instrumentalist has to drudge for that a lot. Under the line, the most easy to learn intervals (and the most widely applicable) are the chromatics. next way: modern technology provides us the harmonizer. This does the shifting job for us - but the fascination of this effect is fading fast. And it doesn't include convincing arpeggios, more options: - the given root key is just shifted as a whole in the course of the solo (usually using half tone steps) - exactly the same (root key shifting) plus additionally shifting the shift continually For the second variation I recommend, to avoid using tone groups of more than three or four tones. And now some important general hints concerning outside-playing: if the player does want, that the outcomes of his efforts are not sounding "wrong" but interesting and elegant: then he must master the inside-playing beforehand!!! Because Ouside-playing only sounds good over the course of shorter musical passages and periods: when it is done over a harmony progression, then it has to end with a tone of the new tonal space when the latter appears at the latest. The inside-note then also should be stressed by a bigger length and more forte. After passing that point one can thoroughly continue with the weird game - transposed to the new background. In other respects one may avoid the "1" in outside-playing. (Don't start or end outside riffs on the "1" - especially don't do that using a longer tone). Or play the "1" inside. The same is valid for other onbeats where the harmony modulates. So - if the modulation happens on the "3" (a quite commonly appearing case) - then one has to go inside shortly at once. Despite of of the above said, the general rule stays: Basically everything is possible. Use your ears:)

Next

© All works and content under Creative Commons License BY NC ND

Tutorial

The Mainstream Soloist

Weirder Options

Here I am dealing with outside playing. I won't explain any maybe-new terms now still - this is a topic for the advanced player. The most common way of playing outside is, to parallel-shift constant- structure intervals (thereby including intervals that are not common to the root tone scale). Example: C | C# | D then C# | D | D# then D | D# | E etc (That was chromatic). Like every other parallel- shifting option mentioned here, this works ascending (like in the example) as well as descending. We could of cause use binary groups of tones instead of the proposed ternary groups too. ("Binary" and "ternary" was dealed with in my chapters about rhythm). The parallel-shifting method works with all intervals. The least "mean" sounding then are the intervals: half tone, whole tone, perfect fourths and perfect fifths. The tritone is also very popular. The learning effort for guitarists is low here - and that's exactly the reason for the widespreadness of this method in the circles of stringed instrument players. Every other instrumentalist has to drudge for that a lot. Under the line, the most easy to learn intervals (and the most widely applicable) are the chromatics. next way: modern technology provides us the harmonizer. This does the shifting job for us - but the fascination of this effect is fading fast. And it doesn't include convincing arpeggios, more options: - the given root key is just shifted as a whole in the course of the solo (usually using half tone steps) - exactly the same (root key shifting) plus additionally shifting the shift continually For the second variation I recommend, to avoid using tone groups of more than three or four tones. And now some important general hints concerning outside-playing: if the player does want, that the outcomes of his efforts are not sounding "wrong" but interesting and elegant: then he must master the inside- playing beforehand!!! Because Ouside-playing only sounds good over the course of shorter musical passages and periods: when it is done over a harmony progression, then it has to end with a tone of the new tonal space when the latter appears at the latest. The inside-note then also should be stressed by a bigger length and more forte. After passing that point one can thoroughly continue with the weird game - transposed to the new background. In other respects one may avoid the "1" in outside- playing. (Don't start or end outside riffs on the "1" - especially don't do that using a longer tone). Or play the "1" inside. The same is valid for other onbeats where the harmony modulates. So - if the modulation happens on the "3" (a quite commonly appearing case) - then one has to go inside shortly at once. Despite of of the above said, the general rule stays: Basically everything is possible. Use your ears:)

Next

Art Lip                Welcome to my universe